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20121121
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for political reasons. the director of the c.i.a. and now current intelligence officials have said no. intelligence agencies changed it not the white house. i don't understand why we're even talking about this still. let's see. he said the intelligence community made substantial analytical changes with the talking points were sent to the government agency, partners for their feedback. there were no substantive changes made to the talking points after they left the intelligence community. period. another anonymous official echoed him saying they were made based on intelligence and legal purposes. first the individual about the individuals linked to al-qaeda was derived from classified sources. classified. second were so tenuous. they still are. it makes sense to be cautious before pointing fingers so you don't set off a chain of circular and self-reinforcing assumptions. third is it important to not prejudice an investigation in the early stages. representative adam schiff who we just had on yesterday from the h
since last friday when general petraeus appeared behind closed doors and he said we knew at the c.i.a. immediately it was terrorism and it said al-qaeda in the official c.i.a. talking points. but after it left our hands, we don't know exactly who changed the talking points. brian, that's what everybody in washington has been trying to figure out, who, who, who did it? >> brian: the national intelligence director, james clapper, the same who went up to general petraeus and said, i really suggest you resign, says it was my office. he said that because the al-qaeda mentions by the c.i.a. in his mind, were tenuous and too tenuous to publicize, so cbs learned and we have confirmed, that we decided to tell congress that -- or susan rice a different story. >> alisyn: this is curious because the committee that's investigating this and the house said that they tonight remember that. in fact, that is quite opposite from what was testified to previously about who knew what when. so congressman mike rogers, who is the chairman of the committee said he finds this story officially, basically, out o
to get out of the way of the hamas militants. according to the c.i.a. world fact books the gaza strip is roughly twice the size of washington, d.c but it holds about a million-plus more people than our nation's capitol. the israeli military warned palestinians to stay away from militants during the conflict, but many people in gaza claim nearly everyone there has ties to hamas in one way or the other. it is the elected government, after all. israel and egypt also enforce a strict blockade on gaza's borders, but hamas developed extensive tunnel systems that they use to smuggle goods, including weapons. team fox coverage continues with jonathan hunt at the united nations for us tonight. israel today targeted hamas' weapons supply routes, yes? >> yes, shep. a series of strikes at the very southern end of the gaza strip near the city of ratha. that city sits on the border between gaza and egypt. and it is underneath that border that there are dozens, perhaps even, according to israeli forces, hundreds of tunnels through which hamas smuggles, among other things, the weapons, the rockets it
crumpton is a legend. and after 24 years in the cia clandestine services, he became a little more public by helping then-secretary of state condoleezza rice coordinate the counterterrorism efforts around the world. he went even more public this past year with a book, a very well-received and well-reviewed book on "the art of intelligence." and behind those emerging from the world of shadows was a driving desire and ambition to educate american policymakers and especially the american public about the needs and uses of intelligence in our hyperconnected world of asymmetrical threats. but before that he created his signal legend in afghanistan where he took roughly 110 cia officers and 400-plus special operations forces to overthrow the taliban. mission accomplished, really, in a few very long weeks. so we'd like to start there, mr. ambassador, and say how did you get that mission, and how did you come up with that plan? >> shelby, thanks for the opportunity to be here. it was an intelligence mission first and foremost. if we look at afghanistan, and we deployed the first teams into afghan
events occurred at the cia last week, my wife immediately gave me a call. [laughter] and she said i hope that there is no way the president is going to ask you to take that job again. i said i have been there, done that. michele, it babies and gentlemen, it is an honor to share some thoughts with you on some of the issues that we confront at the defense department. and also, if i might just take the opportunity since we're close to thanksgiving to wish all of you and your families and happy thanksgiving. michelle is a dear friend and a great, strategic thinker and a great public servant. obviously sorry to leave her see the -- leave the department of defense, but having been in those kinds of jobs most of my life, i understood the reasons why she felt she really wanted to spend some time with her family, and she deserved that. but i should tell you i continue to feel her positive impact throughout the national security community. she is always there. it is not only because of her time as undersecretary of defense for policy, should it is an extremely important position at the department
tenure as director of the c.i.a. and secretary of defense, i have truly been privileged to meet and work with thousands of professionals who have made this fight their fight, who have put their lives on the line for their country and who have built the most effective global counterterrorism network the world has ever seen. their work, i believe, has made the american people safer. the united states more secure. and has put al qaeda on the defensive. let me describe some of the progress that has been achieved in this fight against al qaeda. first of all, with respect to core al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan, and that's where the leadership of al qaeda after 9/11 found refuge. our military forces, our intelligence professionals, our diplomats, our development experts have taken the fight to al qaeda's leadership. first through dramatically expanded counterterrorism operations on the afghanistan-pakistan border. and second, through a renewed, revitalized and properly resourced effort to help build an afghanistan that can secure and govern itself. and that's the fundamental mission in af
to the positions, and i will tell you a story. when events occurred at the cia last week, my wife immediately gave me a call. [laughter] she said, i hope there is no way the president is going to ask you to take that job again. i said no, he's been there, done that. it is an honor to have the chance to share some thoughts with you on so many issues we confront at the defense department, and if i might take this opportunity, since we are close to thanksgiving to wish you and your families and have the thanksgiving. -- a happy thanksgiving. michelle is a great friend, and i am sorry to see her leave the department of defense, but having been in those kinds of jobs most of my life, i anderson the reason she felt she really wanted to spend some time -- i understand the reason she felt she really wanted to spend time with her family. i should tell you i continue to feel her positive impact throughout the national security community. it is not only because of her time as secretary of defense is an important position, but also because she is a co-founder of the center for new american security, and you c
in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do you mean? >> what i mean, and this goes back, it's really a continuation of the same thing. i mean, first of all, in addition to demonstrating the network news divisions could make money, there was a technological explosion. wasn't just the three networks anymore. now you had cable. you have satellite television, the internet. so now there are quite literally hundreds, even thousands of competitors out there. what is incredibly cheap to put on the air is a couple of people like you and me just going at each other, right? talking. what draws an audience is when, in fact, we disagree. when, in fact, we get nasty with
. >> the kardashians never brought down the cia's top guy. >> mika, do you know who pat concernen is? >> yeah. >> reads the paper on the air. incredible programming. >> yeah. >> who would do that? >> homage, the whole episode. >> page 14, that is mitt romney. >> that's a strange picture of mitt. here's mitt romney. not strange. i don't know. >> didn't he get the low sock memo of the early 2000s? >> he's very leggy. >> chasing him around. >> okay. >> what else do we have in news? >> we have the economy. we'll begin there now at 4 past the hour. >> we're going to keep reading the post. go ahead. >> the markets look to rebound after stocks finished relatively flat yesterday following a new warning from the central bank about the fiscal cliff. speaking to the economic club of new york, fed chair ben bernanke urged lawmakers to reach a deal to avoid the automatic spending cuts and tax increases. he said going over the fiscal cliff would pose a substantial risk to the economy. according to a new study the fiscal cliff could give 90% of americans new tax bills when the bush tax rates and some by president oba
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9